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Wednesday February 7, 1973

Another cold, blustery day. Got up at 8am, Went on the 8.33 bus. Another mixed up and frustrating day.June was in lessons all day, and I had 3 out of 6 of mine. Vey busy.
What makes me laugh is that June always doubts that I am keen on her. When I suggested going up to the Emmotts tomorrow she said yes, but that I'd be bored, and she was not wantingt to push me into something "disagreeable" to me! She could not get much further from the truth. I would not miss going to the Emmotts with her for anything. I have a feeling that a romance is blossoming between Denise and Dave L.
At lunchtime Dave and I went down to the chippie to get the weekly order - fish and chips six times and fishcake and chips once - the price came to 98p. I am almost sure that we keep the old woman there in business. Groves went out in the afternoon leaving his 6th formers to the vices of the card table and Christine Braithwaite. I refused to play cards and sat with Cowie instead discussing the qualities of June and Linda W.
At 4 we were all re-united and messed around for half an hour before we went for our buses. June and Linda missed there buses and so waited with Cowie and myself. When the 55 came at 4.45 we were in two minds whether to catch it or not - June looked most depressed when we did. Cowie and I were waving violently from an upstairs window until they disappeared from sight. We hardly spoke on the journey home. Cowie was worried that L had fallen out with him.
With Divine assistance I should be going to the Emmotts with June tomorrow evening. Sadly, however, I am completely out of solid cash. Mum or John will have to deal out some lolly. If not, my marital prospects with Miss Bottomley may be at stake. In our case however, I suspect that the bliss and contentment of our meetings at school alone will usurp the purge of my not attending the Emmotts.
My reputation as a "lady killer" may have been severely weakened today by the rumour put about by the lower 6th that _______had finished with me because of a refusal on my part to go to bed with her. This sordid question never once entered into our relationship and I proceed to treat it with the contempt it deserves. On reflection it is amusing.

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Tuesday February 6, 1973

The 21st anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne. On February 6, 1952 the Queen succeeded to the throne on the sudden death of her father King George VI at the early age of 56. The Queen is only 46 now, and to have been been reigning for 21 years seems so long for one so young. Her grandfather, George V, reigned for 25 years and died aged 72. It cannot be doubted that Her Majesty has made a very good job over these years, and has succeeded in adapting the Monarchy to the present day. The British monarchy is more secure now than it ever has been. I am now reading an interesting book "The Youthful Victoria" by Creston. It is remarkable that a 20 year old woman could terrify Sir Robert Peel and even the Iron Duke himself - Wellington. Such a pity that Victoria was the last British sovereign to be able to tell her government "where to get off" as it were.
A very blustery, windy, sunless day. Icy cold. Got up at 8.10 this morning. After breakfast Mum, Susan and I walked down into Guiseley. I caught the 55 bus at the Station Hotel at 9.05am.
On the whole it was a most boring day, June being in lessons for most of the time. The only two lessons I should have had: History was disbanded whilst Mrs Lane continued her inquisition into the exam paper fiasco. The unlucky victims today were Carol and Sheila. I had been seen to last Thursday. At lunch June refused to eat anything and even as late as 4.10 said she wasn't hungry. The afternoon was especially uneventful but for the fact that I smashed one of the servery cups whilst trying to avoid treading on the furniture - some people just have no luck!
At 4.15 June, Linda, Cowie, Louise and myself went down to the bus stop. Cowie hinted to Linda W that Andy Graham had said something about her, but he would not tell exactly what. She wouldn't let it drop until I told her that AG had told GC that he ought to have it away with L, at which GC told AG that he had already done so. At this AG turned a violent red. Jealousy if you ask me. June boarded the bus at 4.30. Janet Roots came across the road after June had left and pretended to go in the Post Office. Louise and I both realise that Janet is head over heels in love with me. Even Louise had to admit this time that I was doing no 'leading on' in Janet's case. Janet came out of the Post Office (with no evidence of any purchase made therein) and waited with me at my stop until my bus came.
After dinner I had a bath at 9.20. The 9 o'clock news was disturbing. Evidently the Civil Servants and Gas Men are striking for wage increases next week. The Prime Minister has instituted a wage freeze (and price freeze) until the end of March. They are only asking for trouble. What with Ulster; the bother in Vietnam, where it's supposed to be at peace since January 27; the bomb through the Archbishop of Canterbury's bedroom window; anti-Marketeers jeering the Queen, etc, etc. The nation is certainly going to the dogs. What next I ask myself?

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Monday February 5, 1973

Arose at 7.30. Went on the 8.30 bus. June and Linda came at 9.30 and Cowie, looking very tired, came at 9.50. Evidently, he didn't arrive home until 1.30am. Last nights events have triggered a romance between Cowie and Lynda, and she has now cast off her crush on Andy Graham. Chris wants me to go with him and Louise to Leeds this afternoon, but I'd feel like a goosberry, or whatever fruit it is. June wants me to go with her but she is meeting her sister who is in her late twenties, and they'll be on a wild goose-chase around the female boutiques. June, Benita and Lynda are doing the servery this week, and I sat with them throughout break - Dave thinks I'm being anti-social avoiding him. Saw Denise and MM at lunchtime. Dave Chris, Louise and Christine all tramped up to the library. Janet Roots, trying to chat me up, got under my feet. June, Lynda and Cowie all went to Leeds at 2.30. For me a boring and wasteful afternoon.
My evening was spent playing records. "Saturday Night at the Movies" reminds me of Mrs Cuthbert's biology classes last March when June, Johnny and I, plus David Stuttard all messed about together. Talking about Dave Stuttard - and who isn't these days? - I saw him in the tap room at the Emmotts last Thursday. He waved through the hatch to me in the lounge where I am always situated.
June and I fancy going out on Thursday but I will first have to throw myself upon the mercy of Mum and John to give me a substantial loan until Saturday night. I did this last week and can see no reason why I can't do it again. Had a bath. Had supper. Came to bed at 10.30.


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Sunday February 4, 1973

A lazy morning in bed until 12. Had a bath at 2 after helping Mum clear my bedroom which looked in her words "like a pig sty". Watched the telly after lunch then went into the dining room to listen to 'Pick of the Pops' on the radio. Mum and Dad went over to Pudsey to see Auntie Hilda and Uncle Tony at 7.30, and they gave me a lift to Rawdon traffic lights. I had a brisk walk up to the Emmotts arriving at the same time as Dave (Lawson) , who had a half pint of lager whilst I had a Rye and dry ginger. Chris and Louise arrived ten minutes later. After several minutes I went off to see Ivy who was most pleased to see me, and was anxious to know if June and Lynda were coming. June, Janet Roots, Linda, & Cowie arrived at 8.45. We all sat drinking for 2 hours. June and I were sitting together, but Janet messed things up by sitting next to Cowie, but he fancies Linda. At 10.45 we decided that if we all walked down to the main road we could catch a bus at 11.10. It was too romantic for words. June, me, Cowie and Lynda sat on a bench at the bottom of the road like love birds in a row. But Cowie was too drunk to be romantic with L - he kept walking out into the road, ignoring Lynda's screams. She thought he might be struck by a car. At 11.25 we realised no buses would come so we thumbed a lift for the girls who were soon hopping into a car heading towards Horsforth. Cowie and I began walking towards Guiseley. We eventually got a lift. Three cars stopped at once! Talk about choice! The bloke dropped me off at White Cross and took Cowie on to Ilkley - he lives just 2 miles further at Addingham.
After a brisk walk up Thorpe Lane I arrived home at 11.55. Mum and Dad were still at Pudsey. I had some supper and went to bed at 12.55.

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Saturday February 3, 1973

Susan woke me at noon. The television was at full volume. I made Mum and Dad a cup of tea and when I walked in their bedroom I was momentarily stunned. I had forgotten Mum had changed her hair colour, and the sight of an auburn haired doll in the bed with Dad was something to behold. After lunch of "winter salad" I collapsed in front of the TV.
The paper says that Princess Anne and Mark Phillips are to have an Easter engagement. I doubt very much whether it will be so. Royal marriages usually occur following a very long relationship with a separation endurance test thrown in for good measure. After all, Princess Alexandra and Angus Ogilvy, and the Duke of Kent and Katharine Worsley - were all subject to several years separation. Is it not therefor a surprise that Lieutenant Phillips is being sent to Germany with his regiment until 1975. The Princess however, seems to be a headstrong girl and I doubt whether she'd allow the Queen and Prince Philip to dictate to her.
Things didn't half drag at the CW. Time seemed to stand still until 11.30. But it was very busy. Sue told Pauline that she was being stupid having only the one boyfriend at her age. I quite agree. It's wrong to be tied down with someone at only 16. After this lecture Pauline began chatting me up and making eyes at me. I am unable to fancy her. She is totally sexless, and she talks far too much. Sue found P's attitude most amusing. She kept telling Toffer that Pauline was doing her best to chat me up. June was never out of my thoughts all evening.
Arrived home at 1.30. Supper of cheese and wine, retiring to bed one hour later.
I intend putting £2 from my wage into the Post Office on Monday morning, leaving me with £1.50 on which to go wild with tomorrow. I will most likely need a loan for next week.

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Friday February 2, 1973

It is now all round the 6th form about June and I. Michael Stott kept harping on about it all afternoon. I got the 9 o'clock bus. Friday is always a busy day for me starting with double Economics in the morning. At lunchtime Benita made Janet Roots face up. She looked quite attractive. But she is too self-conscious, and was so embarrassed and rubbed it all off. Ruth Ashmore and myself were compelled in the afternoon to do 2 periods of Biology. Louise, the cheating Arab, came across at 3.30. Mrs Stancliffe had the form in hysterics when she came to doing a diagram on the blackboard.
Back in the 6th form June was fooling around pretending to ignore me, and she left at 4 without me, but she was peeping through the window to attract my attention. Today Cowie (Graham Cowburn) kept saying that he didn't know how anyone could put up with June - her being so frivolous and full of vitality. Cowie and Andy G are going to the Emmott Arms on Sunday. Linda W has a terrible crush on Andy, but he ignores her completely.
At 7.30 I went down to the Chuck Wagon. It was completely dead until 9.30. Sue, who was 23 yesterday, had a touch of diarrhoea and did not look at all well all evening. Toffer brought me home at 12.15. Lynn and Susan were watching telly. I came to bed at 1.35. Today Mum reverted from being blond to her natural colour. We were all stunned. She looked so different. At 8.30 Mum, Dad and Auntie Hilda and Uncle Tony went to the Police Ball. They were still not home at 12.30.

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Thursday February 1, 1973

Sue (Riley) is 23. Got up at 8.30 this morning. A beautiful, sunny, crisp day. Went on the 9 o'clock bus. Mrs Lane came across at 10. She wanted to see me first. I have 25 per cent for the European paper and 35 per cent for the British paper. Added together they make 60 per cent out of 200, which is 30 per cent. Luckily, the others didn't do much better. She seemed very cheerful considering the circumstances. At 10.45 I invigilated an exam for Mrs Lane whilst she went for a break. Economics was a laugh as usual. Irene made a usual show of herself. I'm sure old Ayling fancies her. In the common-room this afternoon we make a date for the Emmott Arms tonight.
I arrived at the E at 8.20. T..'s dad bought me a pint of keg. He thought I was going to the Golf Club disco. I sat with Ivy until June and Lynda arrived at 8.45. Chris came at the same time. June looked ravishing as usual. MM and Judith Lea came in at 9, and they took June, L and myself to the Golf Club at about 9.50. The music was very loud. Sue Crosby and Martin Vere-Bunowsky were already dancing. June, L, Chris and me went into the bar for a drink. Andy Graham knocked back a double whisky in one gulp. We were all a bit fresh after the drink and we groped back into the disco for a dance. One of June's friends declared us man and wife. It was a good excuse for us to interlock arms together and fool around. I took them both to the bus stop at 10.40 and J and I kissed goodnight. Never have I hated the 55 bus so much.
My bus came at 11.15. Had a bit of supper and came to bed at 12.

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